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Safety Data Sheet (SDS) PE Anti-mouse CD301a MGL1 Antibody     Product Data Sheet (PDF)    
PE Anti-mouse CD301a (MGL1) Antibody
1328025 25 µg $135.00       
1328030 100 µg $305.00       
Clone: LOM-8.7
Isotype: Rat IgG2a, κ
Reactivity: Mouse
Immunogen: Purified and recombinant mouse MGL1
Formulation: Phosphate-buffered solution, pH 7.2, containing 0.09% sodium azide.
Preparation: The antibody was purified by affinity chromatography and conjugated with PE under optimal conditions. The solution is free of unconjugated PE and unconjugated antibody.
Concentration: 0.2 mg/ml
Storage & Handling: The antibody solution should be stored undiluted between 2°C and 8°C, and protected from prolonged exposure to light. Do not freeze.
Application:

FC - Quality tested

Application Notes:

LOM-8.7 specifically recognizes mouse CD301a. Additional reported applications (for relevant formats) include: immunohistochemical staining of frozen tissue sections1-3, immunoprecipitation4, and blocking of MGL1 binding to its ligand4.

Recommended Usage:

Each lot of this antibody is quality control tested by immunofluorescent staining with flow cytometric analysis. For flow cytometric staining, the suggested use of this reagent is ≤0.5 µg per million cells in 100 µl volume. It is recommended that the reagent be titrated for optimal performance for each application.

Application References:

1. Denda-Nagai K, et al. 2010. J. Biol. Chem. 285:19193. (IHC)
2. Sato K, et al. 2005. Blood 106:207. (IHC)
3. Tsuiji M, et al. 2002. J. Biol. Chem. 277:28892. (IHC)
4. Kimura T, et al. 1995. J. Biol. Chem. 270:16056. (IP, Block)

C57BL/6 bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

C57BL/6 bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were stained with CD11c APC and CD301a (clone LOM-8.7) PE (top) or rat IgG2a, κ PE isotype control (bottom).





Description:

Mouse CD301, also known as macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin, has two homologue genes, CD301a (MGL1) and CD301b (MGL2), while there is only one MGL in human and rat.  Mouse CD301a and CD301b are ~42 kD type II transmembrane glycoproteins containing a cytoplasmic domain, a transmembrane domain, a neck domain, and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) within each molecule. CD301a is mainly expressed on a subset of macrophages and immature dendritic cells (DCs). CD301b is mainly found on conventional DCs. Although CD301a and CD301b share high amino acid sequence homology (92% for the intact sequence and 80% for the CRD), they display different carbohydrate specificities. CD301a was found to be highly specific for Lewis X and Lewis A structures, whereas CD301b, more similar to the human MGL, recognizes N-actetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and galactose, including the O-linked Tn-antigen, TF-antigen, and core 2.  So far, CD301a has been reported to be involved in recognition and  endocytosis of glycoproteins with terminal Gal/GalNAc moieties. This contributes to defense against tumor cell metastasis, tissue remodeling, and clearance of apoptotic cells in embryos. CD301b is involved in the internalization of soluble polyacrylamide polymers (PAA) with α-GalNAc residues (GalNAc-PAA) in bone marrow derived dendritic cells. 

Other Names: MGL, M-ASGP-BP, Macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin, CLEC10A
Structure: 42 kD type II transmembrane glycoprotein, containing a cytoplasmic domain, a transmembrane domain, a neck domain, and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) within each molecule
Distribution: Immature myeloid dendritic cells, a subset of macrophages
Function: Cell adhesion, cell-cell signaling, glycoprotein turnover, inflammation, tissue remodeling
Ligand Receptor: Sialoadhesin, apoptotic cells, and commensal bacteria such as Streptococcus sp
Interaction: Carbohydrate determinants, GP envelope glycoprotein on Marburg and Ebola viruses
Antigen References:

1. Denda-Nagai K, et al. 2010. J. Biol. Chem. 285:19193.
2. Westcott D, et al. 2009. J. Exp. Med. 206:3143.
3. Singh SK, et al. 2008. Mol. Immunol. 46:1240.
4. Sakakura M, et al. 2008. J. Biol. Chem. 283:33665.
5. Tsuiji M, et al. 2002. J. Biol. Chem. 277:28892.